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Mr. Clever Coffee Maker!

Have you ever wonder there is a pour over dripper called "Mr Clever", we tested one and we love it! We created this video on how to make a good cup using it!
Hope you enjoy!


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Trouble getting good coffee while you travel?

Do you guys have trouble enjoying a good cup of coffee while traveling? 
I didn't want to travel with V60, Aeropress. I was looking for something which i can carry around, keeping my coffee warm and importantly able to make delicious coffee. We have finally found it! it's really beautiful and its so tasty! Made one today! 

Espro Travel Press!

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How we make Espresso....

Do you know how we make your Latte?

You have been to Caffè Crema, but do you know how we extract and make a delicious cup of Latte?

At Caffè Crema, we are passionate about our coffee. We measure every grams of coffee we put in & how much liquid comes out.

This is how we make sure our espresso taste delicious: Espresso + Steamed Milk = Latte!

If you would like to learn more? Do come and visit us at our Caffè

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Hario V60 Pour Over Brewing Method by Caffè Crema

Here's one of our favourite brewing method for Single Origin coffee... Hario V60, it brings out the true flavour single origin coffee.... Today we brewed by Ethiopia Natural Processed Beloya. It's sweet berry like, hint of flowery note, medium to light body with ample of sweetness and lovely smooth aftertaste.

Have you tried? 

 


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Singapore Brew-Along (Day 5)

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Singapore Brew-Along (Day 5)

Day 5 

commonman roaster

 

Ah, the customer is king. It’s good to know that customer service standards in Singapore are above reproach and something that Malaysian cafes should aspire to. Finally, I’m able to serve instead of serving and perusing green beans till the cows come home. My first pit stop is Common Man Roaster. I met owner Harry Grover and he shared his passion for his craft.

coffee

 

He served us an intoxicating house blend called CMCR which consisted of fruity Ethiopia Yirgzero and Guatemala Los Santos which gave my drink its chocolaty caramel body. I also detect Sumatra Tiga Raja that gave my drink a sweet, spicy finish. I love this coffee…

 

Not one to shy away from a little humour. I also sampled the “Lucky Basterd” flat whites. It consisted of Ethiopian Ardi Sidama (Natural) and Costa Rica Community varieties. There’s the sweet fragrance of Ethiopia that is berry-like replete with floral note and, of course, the chocolaty after taste of its Costa Rican beans.

 

nylon coffee

Nylon Coffee Roaster is a very famous boutique specialty coffee roaster in Singapore. Run by a knowledgeable husband-and-wife team, they sourced their beans directly with producers. I tried a V60 pour over Kenya Karinga that was abundantly aromatic due to its floral bouquet which also left a silky aftertaste in the mouth. It was a complex cup but a balanced one all the same. Next, we tried a Colombia Villa Rica V60 pour over. This coffee came up second in the Best Cup Cauca competition and I was blown away by the complexity on the palate –  superbly balanced cup that juggles plum, chocolate and black tea that is a clear winner in my books and a favourite for the day!



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Singapore Brew-Along (DAY 4)

Day 4

pour over

 

It’s getting hot in here! There are numerous safety precautions when it comes to handling a roasting machine because temperatures can reach a few hundred Celsius – No play, play! As they like to say in Singapore. We are also taught how to best brew a cup of coffee using the Aeropress, Chemex , Clever and V60 methods. With Seed to Cup and Brewing Extraction Principles, we are able to understand the logic behind the optimum temperature, brewing time and brew ratio for an invigorating cup of coffee.

 

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Singapore Brew-Along (DAY 3)

Day 3 

roasting

 

Who says that all beans are created equal? It’s time to get technical today as an introduction to roasting concepts paved the way to a whole day of roasting green, medium and dark roast varieties. The Probay roaster we used was a massive one and all beans are packed and sealed into paper bags to ensure freshness.  

Packed


From there we moved on to profiling the different roasted variants and smelling different batches and how the differing smell textures affect the end result as to how the coffees tasted. It was interesting to learn differentiating the olfactory components of grass, hay, bread, toast, caramel and eventually coffee and the varying sensation that each gave as their elements are broken up to allow their flavours to surface. A good nose is definitely required while adding hot water to grounded beans.

cupping coffee

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Singapore Brew-Along (DAY 2)

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Singapore Brew-Along (DAY 2)

Day 2

supping

After feeling slightly cross-eyed after yesterday’s session, I’m feeling like the Karate Kid waxing on (and off) and having no idea why. I’m a glutton for caffeinated punishment as I return to learn about how the beans are graded by aroma, fragrance, taste (dry and wet). Finally, it’s an orientation to SCAA’s Cupping techniques and it’s great to be able to break down the uniqueness of each cup in its original form.

There’s also the decaffeination process which involves soluble agents are able to selective in terms washing out only the caffeine and retaining all the key flavours in your coffee. Oh boy is it fascinating to see how it’s done. I feel like a chemical engineering undergrad as the process is insanely complicated.   

 

roasting

And finally, I get my hands on a roasting machine and it’s a first for me to experience operating the Giesen Roasting machine that is very hot to the touch. Ouch! But the various knobs and indicators are a godsend as they allow me to subtly control even small variants in how I wish to roast up a batch of beans. 

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Singapore Brew-Along (DAY 1)

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Singapore Brew-Along (DAY 1)

Singapore Brew-Along

 

Day 1 

 

Like many people I know, I spend long hours reading up on coffee and often feeling the urge to bolt out of Malaysia and see what’s on offer in other coffee loving countries. And after recently conquering Melbourne I decided to set my sights on Singapore. That’s because our neighbours down south have become a very sophisticated lot when it comes to their ability to distinguish between good and even better coffee.

It aptly illustrates how Singapore has grown from savouring Kopi-o at heartland coffee shops, to coffee chains in the 1990s and eventually having awesome specialty coffee boutiques pop-up. I’m also glad the Island State is playing host to several notable coffee appreciation classes and that’s exactly how I kick-started my trip:

My first day of class was a full day session that’s organised by the Singapore arm of the Specialty Coffee Association of America. It was a little overwhelming at first, but I’m having a blast! I’m putting in the ‘ground’ work – pun intended. The first was of course to become acclimated with how coffee was produced in farms and the logistical flow and painstaking process single origins are sourced from mills before they make it to a reputable roaster and eventually consumers.

SCAA

 

I believe all-comers who catch a glimpse of the procedures will grow to appreciate their daily cup of coffee even more. There’s a once-over on procurement of the all the necessary essentials for any coffee lover including the handling and purchase of a roasting machine. The classroom format is suitable in meritocratic Singapore, and I wouldn’t be surprised if they handed out buku latihans for us to take notes.

Beans


Nevertheless, they did hand out an Arabica Green Coffee Handbook and we trained to identify defective green beans. Sorting took me almost two hours as I laboured over every broken, withered and damaged bean to ensure that the eventual batch that is sent to be roasted for coffee drinkers. All I can say is that it’s a whole lot of work for a pittance in beans that eventually passes scrutiny. It’s a very thorough grading process that sifts through every flaw to make sure that every single bean is up to scratch. And yes, I appreciate every cup of coffee even more! A lot of effort goes into the process of making a simple cup of drinkable coffee. Onwards!

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Mahlkoenig Vario K30 Grinder - How to adjust?

Here's a video on how to do a "ZERO ADJUSTMENT" to your commercial grinder. As there are not many tips and documents on how to do this on the Internet. It will be beneficial to fellow Barista with this video by Caffe Crema.

Step by step guide on how you setup your Mahlkoenig Vario K30. To zero adjust your grinder.

 

 

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My Coffee Journey (Day 6)

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My Coffee Journey (Day 6)

Market Lane

Nonetheless, with so many distractions in Melbourne I had to stop by Market Lane to have my Flat White Siberia. I love the simplicity of its all-white brick interior, but the superior coffee is the second-to-none. Their beans are often in-season varieties and with its proximity to the nearby wet market there are usually a big crowd on weekends with very limited seating. 

109-111 Therry Street, Melbourne

 

Seven Seed

After refreshing up, I had to end my trip with the legendary Seven Seed. Founder Mark Dundon started this after selling off St ALi. High-flying Melbourne University students frequent the place and I guess they are mugging for exams with single origins coffees and probably part-timing to earn their keep. From the outside it looks like a quiet, quintessential café, but as I walked in the venue is packed to the brim with customers eating, chit-chatting and enjoying their cuppa.  You’ll have to wait your turn on occasion, but it’s well-worth the wait. 

14 Berkeley Street, Carlton


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My Coffee Journey (Day 5) Part 3

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My Coffee Journey (Day 5) Part 3

Auction Rooms got its name as a result of it being an old auction house that is now a converted warehouse. Its exterior is slightly weathered and a fresh coat of blue over its brick walls lends it an understated look. It may never earn brownie points for the way it looks on the outside but it gets full marks for its efforts as an approachable industrial setting for all-comers. I had the single origin Guatemala and it was one of my favourite coffees of the day simply because it was the perfect flat white beverage. Its central location and selections of ‘coffee of the day’ also make it ideal for people-watching and taking in the sights and sounds of North Melbourne. 

103-107 Errol Street, North Melbourne

Code Black is smacked right in the middle of Auction Rooms and Seven Seeds. It took some time to get off the ground, but I’m glad to be here to see the setup where you can see all the baristas operating big heavy roasting machines. I had and Ethopian Konga espresso and bought myself a small bag of Columbia Camilo Merizalde washed and Geisha Varietal. I made some espresso and flat white at Caffe Crema and all I can say that it’s texture is simply awesome. Code Black also serves the corporate executives in the area. It’s time to call it a day. 

119 Howard Street, North Melbourne 

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My Coffee Journey (Day 5) Part 2

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My Coffee Journey (Day 5) Part 2

Nolan Hirte is the founder of Proud Mary and you can even witness the roasting of the coffee within the premises where they source their beans from farms all over the world directly. The place is also a little psychedelic and the all-day breakfast and lunch menus are excellent. The wonderful vibes we enjoy sitting here certainly serves to make the experience even more gratifying (the won the Golden Eagle Award at the Golden Bean Roasters competition in 2013) as the fact that the owner cares about the famers, often the best variety of beans are sold in Proud Mary bags. 

172 Oxford Street, Collingwood, Yarra 

Next we head to affiliate Aunty Peg’s. It is also where Proud Mary’s coffee beans are roasted. You can literally see the roasting in action. It looks like a popular spot for hipsters, but what I like is that it’s ONLY black coffee – no milk in this café. I had mine in a print straight from the tap and it wasn’t too strong. I also sampled the very expensive (and limited) hr61 coffee at AUD30 a pop, which makes the good even better. I also enjoyed the pastries including croissants and bagels that were very well-made.   

200 Wellington Street, Collingwood


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My Coffee Journey (Day 5) Part 1

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My Coffee Journey (Day 5) Part 1

DAY 5 Part 1

Patricia Coffee Brewers is a different order of coffee and quite easily one of my favourite. It was rated the number two café in Melbourne and melds three simple offerings of black, white and filter – the flow was flawless – with complex Seven Seed roasted techniques. We sample the iced poured coffee over that’s redolent of something found at a watering hole or speakeasy bar.  I love the “Standing Room Only” articulation of what it means to be a fan of its cosy interior that is small but perfect. In fact, you can buy beans repackaged in colourful containers and the staffs are immensely friendly and make you feel welcomed whether you’re a coffee nut or just an amateur who needs his or her caffeine fix.  

 

493-495 Little Bourke Street, Melbourne

I’m a converted fan of the avant garde layout, seeing that the space of Filter by Small Batch that’s split into half with one side looking like a bank lobby with first impression officers and a high ceilings – is it after all housed in abandoned office building – is a sight to behold because it’s organised an uncluttered. The spaciousness is definitely is certainly a plus if you want to have a change of scenery from the tight quarters of other coffee houses as there’s a focused corner for espressos and lengthy filter coffee section. I briefly tangled with a filter coffee extracted from a Mahlkoenig EK43 double bean hopper and and Scandinavian style sandwiches. Before we know it, it’s to make a move and if you have a tight schedule, this place is perfect with paper cups for a quick refill before your next urgent appointment with your banker. 

555 Colins Street, Melboune


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My Coffee Journey (Day 4)

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My Coffee Journey (Day 4)

DAY 4

Café chairs suspended mid-air was a startling sight at Brother Baba Budan. Named after the 17th century Sufi who smuggled coffee seeds out of the middle east, I decided a Kenya Karatu Filter Coffee.  Locals also pop by there to purchase freshly baked brownies prepared daily. I’m particularly fascinated by the scuttling crowd who come for their daily fix. The space is small but it’s still very surreal interior that looks like an old storage cabinet

 

359 Little Bourke Street, Melbourne

 

Sensory Lab is a short walk away and the espresso macchiato is hard to beat. They use syphon and cold drip techniques perfectly and the interior and clean and stark white as a contrast to Brother Baba Budan’s intentionally cluttered visage. Walk in from the hustle and bustle of that busy stretch is always a pleasure on this trip and the selection cater to a loyal following of customers. 


Going café hopping tomorrow. Be there, or be square!

297 Little Collins Street, Melbourne

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My Coffee Journey (Day 3)

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My Coffee Journey (Day 3)

Filter Coffee Class

I decided to sit in for Filter Coffee Class and learned the fundamentals of making a good cup of coffee, including ratios. While the full house at the Gold Cup Analysis Class in the afternoon appears an omen of what would be in store for the scientific take on coffee research with a whole of math and stabbing of calculators involve. I’m particularly fascinated by The Coffee Brewing Handbook that had graphs with X- and Y- axis for a brewing control chart. 


I didn’t realise that we’ve worked up quite an appetite and having a chat with last year’s World Barista Champion Hidenori Izaki from Japan was the icing on the cake – he even signed my paper napkin.  Although I was famished yearning for local fare, the caffeine was buzzing and the atmosphere composed of coffee lovers was most welcoming. 

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My Coffee Journey - Melbourne, Australia (DAY 2)

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My Coffee Journey - Melbourne, Australia (DAY 2)

Coffee 101 by SCAA

I almost missed our chance to gain some insight into new coffee trends in an industry insider’s session about coffee including seeing a cool new customized machines and espresso and milk steaming fundamentals and principals of brewing and extraction.  I’m reminded how we can treat ourselves to a beverage that excites. The formalities done with effortlessly, Sebastian our lecturer and guide greet us. I also met World Barista Champions James Hoffmann and Matt Perger. 


Psyched, I’m going to make our way through the nooks and crannies of Melbourne and hopefully find the best coffee the city has to offer. I also attended the Australia Barista Championship and met the Brazil Specialty Coffee Association who shared some insights into Brazilian Cupping (not that kind!) – and thus begins our coffee discovery in earnest. 

Note: I also saw some heavy duty La Marzocco customized machines.  


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My Coffee Journey - Melbourne, Australia (DAY 1)

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My Coffee Journey - Melbourne, Australia (DAY 1)

DAY 1

The first thing I did touching down for the first time in Melbourne, Australia was to take an Uber ride to St. Ali & Family. They are famous for their roasting their own beans as popularised by world champion barista, Matt Perger. My first drink was an espresso concocted from washed Ethiopia Wottona Boltuma that definitely perked me up from my seven hour flight. 

 

I was understandably beat from schoozing with the locals here who are just as well verse with coffee as I am. And why not? It means I can leave my worries behind and enjoy a fuss free coffee experience in a corner shop lot that has whitewashed brick walls and a post-industrial facade. Smiling faces are the perfect introduction to Australian hospitality. My follow up was a Colombia El Meridiano AA: I detected hints of apricot, cheery and a rich, velvety dark chocolate aftertaste. 

 

They are also early adopters of specialty coffee and since Mark Dundon sold the joint to Salvatore Malatesto its business as usual with this tent pole of Melbourne coffee. Beans are purchased direct from growers and their very experienced of roster of coffee makers including, of course, Matt Perger, Leon Holdsworth and Lachlan Ward. The servers have an effortless gait about them; from switching between different the cashier and the roaster to keeping their composure when the lines are extending. 

The barista also design the most intricate latte art and the robust flavours are intoxicating to any true coffee lover. We discern a slightly unique aspect of this fair city and realized they are just as crazy about their coffee as I’ve come to expect. I decided to have one more for the road and ordered a filter coffee with light roasted (instead of washed) Ethiopia Wottona Boltuma. It is fascinating how they brew filter coffee using a La Marzocco GS3 espresso machine that is then filtered with a Hario V60 coffee dripper. 


12-18 Yarra Place, South Melbourne VIC 3205, Australia


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Tips about Coffee : Grinding your Coffee

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Tips about Coffee : Grinding your Coffee

Do you buy pre-grounded Coffee? 

If you do, you should start thinking about buying fresh beans and grinding it your own. WHY?
Freshness is utmost important in your cup of coffee. Pre-grounded coffee losses it flavours almost 60% after about 15 minutes. 

How grinding your coffee makes any difference at all? 

Always invest in a good grinder, never buy a cheap blade grinder! It will do the job, however particle size of your coffee is uneven thus giving you bad extractions. For home use, we suggest hand burr grinder. Different grind size will affect your coffee tremendously. 

Grind Size

Extra Coarse: Small chunky coffee
Coarse: Chunky, coarse sea salt.
Medium: coarse sand.
Fine: like sugar or salt
Extra Fine: similar to extra fine sugar (powdery but not as much)
Turkish Grind: Like flour, very powdery.

How do you brew your coffee?

French Press, you will require to hard coarse grind size.
Vario V60 Pour Over : Medium Coarse
Moka Pot : Medium Fine
Espresso : Fine
Turkish Coffee : Extra Fine

Imagine your coffee grounds as Sand... the coarser your grind the faster water will flow thru, thus giving you a faster extraction and pour. Finer grind size, it will extract longer and slower pour, giving you strong tasting coffee.

Every method of brewing will have suggested extraction time. i.e. Hario V60 Pour over : +- 2-3 minutes. If your coffee takes more than 3 minutes to brew what do you do? Your grind size might be too fine for pour over. Adjust your grind size slightly and try again! 

In the coffee world, there is nothing right or wrong! Importantly enjoy the process and a great cup of coffee!

 

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